Trawling through the Internet, I came across a report on McKinsey Insights that spoke about the gender diversity still gaining ground in Latin America as well as our advancing society. I wondered whether it is a good idea to have a good women boss around or some incompetent person with his qualification being simply male. Am I turning metrosexual raising this question? No, not really – just trying to convey a point, as growing up in all boys’ school in Delhi, relationships with girls and women were an aspiration in my all-male cohort.

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In that school we had women teachers, and mine were excellent. Later I had male teachers and they too were excellent. That Indian school was rather hierarchical – teachers gave orders and students obeyed, and certainly submitted homework or else… I think that early training to follow women as well as men made me rather open to learning from, taking orders from and reporting to women, just as comfortably as to men. I have never visited Latin America and cannot comment on their situation, but I suspect early exposure to some kind of gender diversity in positions of power could help overcome resistance to taking orders from women.

Women As Managers:

I have had women teachers and have worked under a woman manager only once. My personal experience is that they can be very good managers. Additionally, they are just as susceptible to bias as any other human, just as managers of either gender may be susceptible to bias based on other factors, such as race, sports group, club membership etc. My own feeling is that a good manager minimizes biases in favour of good management, and therefore a logical extension is that since women can be good managers, they can work with unbiased attitudes to the extent human. Similarly, in a biased environment, such as an otherwise all-male environment women are just as likely to succeed as  I suppose any other biased situation.

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Do Management Rules Differ Based On Gender?

Most of my work experience since the late eighties has been in or with Japan-owned companies. In my early days in Japan, women recruits from the same university as a male counterpart were assigned very different nature of tasks, and it bothered me. Gradually over the last 25 years I have seen this gender discrimination reduce, but fellow male Japanese workers who are in their forties still speak openly about gender-based roles.

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In Hitachi however, I notice that younger managers in their twenties are less discriminatory in their mindset about gender based assignment allocation. So, I think these things take time. Certainly Hitachi benefits by accessing a greater proportion of a declining Japanese population for their managerial cadre. I think in Hitachi’s case the Human Resources Department made conscious efforts to promote gender equality to opportunity. Such forward looking HR Departments can help others improve over time. The Indian situation is better than Japan’s with visible role models, for example in finance industry, heading leading banks such as State Bank of India, ICICI Bank or Axis Bank. If these banks found it prudent to place the best person for the job at their help, surely others should too!

I think the gradually increasing visibility of women in positions of senior management is successful in propelling more in the same direction. The snowball effect is encouraging. It is even more encouraging that in the realm of business this has been entirely based on merit, rather than reservation. Perhaps development programs across the world that rely on reservation need to be reconsidered in the light of this success case. Something to study about!

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